This CEO feels books help change perspective in life, spends Sundays reading & sipping on hot cocoa

Ayush Bansal shares how books give him a break from continuous screen time.

Agencies
Bansal does not read as often as he would like. But after exercising in the morning, he tries and gets some reading done while having breakfast.
Ayush Bansal, Foxmula CEO and Co-founder has read quite a few books during the lockdown including ‘The Secret’, ‘Tales of 2 Cities’, ‘The Lean Start up’. Fiction books such as ‘God is a Gamer’, ‘Inferno’ and ‘A Dog's Life’.

"Books enable living vicariously through the characters we read about. There are too many lessons I have taken away from books to name. But recently, when I read ‘A Dog's Life’, it really did decontextualise the plight of stray dogs for me. I, for years now, go out every night to feed stray dogs near my house. I know the difficulties they face but again books offer different perspectives. This book helped me feel the uncertainty they face in their day-to-day lives. Despite that looming uncertainty, they face every minute with a smile. When they look at us and put a smile on our faces too. This further emboldened my prior belief that one must keep marching forward through difficult times with a smile on your face," he told ET Panache.

Bansal does not read as often as he would like. But after exercising in the morning, he tries and gets some reading done while having breakfast.


"For the most part, I read right before I am going to go to sleep. Something to wind down the day essentially. I read about random things - fiction, non-fiction, folklore and much more. I like to read about random things because it lets my mind come away from the problem I was obsessively working on during the day. A different world and being in a different perspective can really help being in the moment," he said.

No tablet is going to replace the utter peacefulness Bansal feels during a rainy Sunday afternoon with a warm cup of cocoa in one hand and an old book in the other. "Given I spend 10 to 12 hours a day in front of screens, I really appreciate books in an old school way," he said.

Predictive Text: 'Frankenstein', '1984' And Other Books That Foretold The Future
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A look back at the different times when authors unleashed the Nostradamus in them and came up with something that was years ahead of its time.

A look back at the different times when authors unleashed the Nostradamus in them and came up with something that was years ahead of its time.

Vision: Virus outbreak

In 1981, Dean Koontz wrote a novel titled 'The Eyes of Darkness'. In the book, Koontz mentions a fictional biological weapon Wuhan-400, nearly 40 years before the coronavirus outbreak occurred.

'The Eyes of Darkness' is a story about a mother who discovers her son Danny is being kept in a military facility after being infected with a man-made microorganism called ‘Wuhan-400’. While Twitter went into a little bit of tizzy, that’s where the similarity ends. Unlike the book’s virus, which has a 100 per cent fatality rate, the real world covid-40 has a fatality rate that ranges between two per cent and 14 per cent, depending on several factors.

(Image: Amazon)

Vision: Virus outbreakIn 1981, Dean Koontz wrote a novel titled 'The Eyes of Darkness'. In the book, Koontz mentions a fictional biological weapon Wuhan-400, nearly 40 years before the coronavirus ou..
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Vision: Electric submarines

Jules Verne is considered one of the most forward thinking authors of the 19th century and has predicted numerous things in his most famous book, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea, which was published in 1870. Verne not only predicted electric submarines 90 years before they were invented, he also imagined them just as they turned out — long and cylindrical. Verne’s submarine called Nautilus also included a main cabin, navigational devices, a dining room, and barometer.

(Image: barnesandnoble.com)

Vision: Electric submarinesJules Verne is considered one of the most forward thinking authors of the 19th century and has predicted numerous things in his most famous book, Twenty Thousand Leagues Un..
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Vision: Mass surveillance

Orwell’s book focuses on topics we are all too familiar with today: Censorship, propaganda, surveillance, and oppressive governments. It was written nearly 70 years ago. In the book, Orwell predicted mass surveillance and police helicopters. Much of what the British author imagined has come true, including facial recognition, speech to text conversion, music made by artificial intelligence, and, of course, the concept of ‘Big Brother’ watching your every move.

(Image: Amazon)

Vision: Mass surveillanceOrwell’s book focuses on topics we are all too familiar with today: Censorship, propaganda, surveillance, and oppressive governments. It was written nearly 70 years ago. In t..
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Vision: Mars has two moons

This all-time favourite book follows a man named Gulliver as he stops at different worlds, those occupied by giants, another by little humans, and one of the most interesting, the island of Laputa. Laputa, in the book, is a floating world filled with scientists. Swift writes about how Gulliver and Laputian astronomers noted that Mars has two moons in its orbit. Today we know this claim to be true, that Mars indeed does have two moons. But Swift wrote 'Gulliver’s Travels' in 1726, nearly 150 years before Phobos and Deimos — the two moons of Mars — were discovered in 1877.

Vision: Mars has two moonsThis all-time favourite book follows a man named Gulliver as he stops at different worlds, those occupied by giants, another by little humans, and one of the most interestin..
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Vision: Organ Transplants

Written in 1818, Shelley’s novel is often considered one of the first science-fiction novels. At that time, science was just beginning to explore the concept of bringing dead tissue back to life using electricity. In Mary Shelley’s 'Frankenstein', the doctor is able to keep an organ alive outside of a body to be transplanted into a new body. To say this was ahead of its time is an understatement. It wasn’t until the mid-20th century (1954) that the first organ transplant became a reality.

Vision: Organ TransplantsWritten in 1818, Shelley’s novel is often considered one of the first science-fiction novels. At that time, science was just beginning to explore the concept of bringing dead..
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