Star-studded panel for inaugural ET Panache Dialogues, art elitism to be discussed

Theme of the first edition of the event is 'has art ​become too elitist?'.

BCCL
The first ET Panache Dialogues will be held at the Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai on Friday.
Technology has dramatically changed the definition and consumption patterns of the visual arts. Even in such times, the appeal of a painting on a wall or a sculpture made with bare hands retains its power to stop people in their tracks. Artworks also command astronomical prices, and adorn palaces and museums. This has made art more than just an object of aesthetic beauty or meaning. Art also has the potential to be a financial asset and something to make a statement with.

It is the nature of art that it is humble and lofty at the same time. But has it become too elitist? That is the theme of the first ET Panache Dialogues, to be held at the Taj Mahal Hotel in Mumbai on Friday, July 26.

A distinguished panel will deliberate on the subject. It comprises G V Sanjay Reddy, vice chairman, GVK, Sabyasachi Mukherjee, director general, Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya, Bhushan Gagrani, Principal Secretary, Team CMO (Chief Minister's Office, Government of Maharashtra), Gayatri Ruia, director, Phoenix Mills, Bose Krishnamachari, artist and curator and Minal Vazirani, co-founder and president, Saffronart. Each of them has made significant contributions to art in India in their own different ways.


(L-R) Business tycoon GV Sanjay Reddy, artist Bose Krishnamachari, Gayatri Ruia of Phoenix Mills, Sabyasachi Mukherjee of CSMVS Museum Art Conservation Centre, and Saffronart's Minal Vazirani are a part of the panel discussion.
(L-R) Business tycoon GV Sanjay Reddy, artist Bose Krishnamachari, Saffronart's Minal Vazirani, Sabyasachi Mukherjee of CSMVS Museum Art Conservation Centre and Gayatri Ruia of Phoenix Mills will be a part of the panel discussion.

The subject of the conversation has many important subpoints. What role are authorities and museums meant to play in making art accessible to everyone? How can one increase the appeal of art so that it impacts and influences the maximum number of people? Does the standard of art education in India need to improve?

It promises to be a stimulating discussion on a topic we love. We will bring it to readers with coverage in ET Panache and across our digital platforms.

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Watch this space for more updates...

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(Text: Viandra D'souza)
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