Making new strides, everyday: Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel Peace Prize 2020

In 2019, she was among four people named as the winners of a Right Livelihood Award.

Making new strides, everyday: Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel Peace Prize 2020
COPENHAGEN: Two lawmakers in Sweden have nominated Swedish teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg for the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize.

Jens Holm and Hakan Svenneling, who are both members of Sweden's Left Party, said Monday that Thunberg “has worked hard to make politicians open their eyes to the climate crisis” and “action for reducing our emissions and complying with the Paris Agreement is therefore also an act of making peace.”

The 2015 landmark Paris climate deal asks both rich and poor countries to take action to curb the rise in global temperatures that is melting glaciers, raising sea levels and shifting rainfall patterns. It requires governments to present national plans to reduce emissions to limit global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit).


Thunberg, 17, has encouraged students to skip school to join protests demanding faster action on climate change, a movement that has spread beyond Sweden to other European nations and around the world. She founded th e Fridays for Future movement that has inspired similar actions by other young people.

Any national lawmaker can nominate somebody for the Nobel Peace Prize, and three members of the Norwegian Parliament nominated Thunberg last year.

In 2019, she was among four people named as the winners of a Right Livelihood Award, also known as the "Alternative Nobel" and she was named Time magazine's “Person of the Year.” The Norwegian Nobel Committee doesn't publicly comment on nominations, which for 2020 had to be submitted by Feb. 1.
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Going Under: Mumbai, Miami Among Cities That May Be Submerged Due To Climate Crisis
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As climate change tightens its hold over the planet, rising water levels are a major concern. These six cities are at most risk.


(In Pic: Mumbai)

As climate change tightens its hold over the planet, rising water levels are a major concern. These six cities are at most risk.(In Pic: Mumbai)

Bangkok is sinking at a rate of more than 1 centimetre a year and could be below sea level by 2030. The reason for this could be the towering skyscrapers which are causing the ground to cave in on itself. To help prevent flooding, an architectural firm built a 11-acre park that can hold a million gallons of rainwater. The park is designed to face future uncertainties, but Bangkok’s 20 million residents will continue to face threats of sea-level rise.

Bangkok is sinking at a rate of more than 1 centimetre a year and could be below sea level by 2030. The reason for this could be the towering skyscrapers which are causing the ground to cave in on it..
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A climate change report this year said India’s financial capital would be completely submerged by the turn of the century. Mumbai, several parts of which are at sea level, is already prone to flooding. Due to lack of upgradation to its drainage system, and partially due to encroachments on the creeks which were natural channels for diverting the water’s flow, Mumbai wit-nesses severe flooding every year. The Arabian Sea could begin entering and flooding parts of Mumbai by 2050, leav-ing nearly the whole city and suburbs under water.

A climate change report this year said India’s financial capital would be completely submerged by the turn of the century. Mumbai, several parts of which are at sea level, is already prone to floodin..
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Miami’s sea levels are rising at rates faster than in other areas of the world, resulting in f loods, contaminated drinking water, and major damage to homes and roads. Miami and Miami Beach already struggle with serious flooding related to sea-level rise, even when there is no rain. The flat, low-lying areas are surrounded by rising seas, and the ground underneath is mostly porous limestone, which means water will eventually rise through it.

Miami’s sea levels are rising at rates faster than in other areas of the world, resulting in f loods, contaminated drinking water, and major damage to homes and roads. Miami and Miami Beach already s..
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Venice’s flooding in 2019 was already the worst the city had seen in a decade. Famous tourist attractions like St Mark’s Basilica and the Piazza San Marco were submerged in water, while the many precious artworks that the city is home to were also at risk. A recent study showed that the city, which was built on stilts, is also tilting to the East.

Venice’s flooding in 2019 was already the worst the city had seen in a decade. Famous tourist attractions like St Mark’s Basilica and the Piazza San Marco were submerged in water, while the many prec..
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The Indonesian capital is the world’s fastest sinking city, going down by 6.7 inches every year. Forty per cent of Jakarta currently lies below sea level. But the main reason it’s sinking is rampant groundwater pumping. This creates a change in pressure and volume that causes the land to sink. Worst hit are the northern areas, including the port of Tanjung Priok. So dire is the situation that authorities have decided to move the seat of government to a forest on the island of Borneo.

The Indonesian capital is the world’s fastest sinking city, going down by 6.7 inches every year. Forty per cent of Jakarta currently lies below sea level. But the main reason it’s sinking is rampant ..
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New Orleans is projected to see 14.5 inches of sea level rise by 2040, among the highest in the world. NASA’s maps show parts of the city sinking at a rate of two inches per year, mostly areas near the Mississippi River and industrialised sectors like Norco and Michoud. Like other major cities, the rising water level is being caused by groundwater pumping, human withdrawal of water, oil, and gas, compacting of shallow sediments and continued land movement from glaciers.

New Orleans is projected to see 14.5 inches of sea level rise by 2040, among the highest in the world. NASA’s maps show parts of the city sinking at a rate of two inches per year, mostly areas near t..
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