Love processed foods? It may up risk of depression

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Can a healthy diet combat mental illness? In an unusual experiment, the researchers from the James Cook University in Australia have found that among Torres Strait Islander people, the amount of fish and processed food eaten is related to depression. A JCU research team led by Professors Zoltan Sarnyai and Robyn McDermott looked at the link between depression and diet on a Torres Strait island, where fast food is available, and on a more isolated island, which has no fast food outlets. Lead author Dr Maximus Berger said that the team interviewed around 100 people on both islands.

"We asked them about their diet, screened them for their levels of depression and took blood samples. As you'd expect, people on the more isolated island with no fast food outlets reported significantly higher seafood consumption and lower takeaway food consumption compared with people on the other island," he said.
The researchers identified 19 people with moderate to severe depressive symptoms: sixteen were from the island where fast food is readily available, while only three from the other island.

Cut Down On Salt, Drink Fluids: Simple Diet Tips To Avoid Chronic Heart Failure
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Cardiac or heart failure is a clinical condition in which the heart loses the ability to eject blood to meet the requirements of the tissues of the body. Irrespective of the cause, nutritional concerns need to be addressed in this condition in order to prevent morbidity and mortality. Patients with chronic heart failure are at constant risk of losing weight due to the medical condition and also low dietary intake which is due poor appetite, depression or loss of appetite due to consumption of drugs.

Dietary interventions to maintain and restore the nutritional balance are essential part of treatment therapy. These include a suitable change in calorie intake, reduction in sodium and fluid intake, maintenance of potassium and magnesium in the body, and appropriate supplementation with vitamins and minerals.

Here are some simple tips by Dr Ritika Samaddar, Chief Nutritionist at Max Hospital, Saket.

Cardiac or heart failure is a clinical condition in which the heart loses the ability to eject blood to meet the requirements of the tissues of the body. Irrespective of the cause, nutritional concer..
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Obese patients are encouraged to lose weight to minimize cardiac workload. On the other hand, in the malnourished patients with chronic heart failure, the calorie intake has to be increased to match the requirement.

Obese patients are encouraged to lose weight to minimize cardiac workload. On the other hand, in the malnourished patients with chronic heart failure, the calorie intake has to be increased to match ..
Read More

In patients with heart failure, a reduction in salt intake brings about a significant improvement. Mostly, the limit is set at 2-3 gm of salt per day. This requires a control on the intake of sodium rich foods, and restricted use of table salt.

In patients with heart failure, a reduction in salt intake brings about a significant improvement. Mostly, the limit is set at 2-3 gm of salt per day. This requires a control on the intake of sodium ..
Read More

Most diuretics increase the excretion of potassium and magnesium leading to depletion of minerals in the body. A diet high in potassium and magnesium-rich foods like fresh fruits and vegetables is encouraged and also the use of supplements.

Most diuretics increase the excretion of potassium and magnesium leading to depletion of minerals in the body. A diet high in potassium and magnesium-rich foods like fresh fruits and vegetables is en..
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In patients with a severe fluid overload, those requiring high doses of diuretic, or those taken to excessive fluid intake, the total daily water and fluid intake should be limited in the range of 500 to 2000 ml daily.

In patients with a severe fluid overload, those requiring high doses of diuretic, or those taken to excessive fluid intake, the total daily water and fluid intake should be limited in the range of 50..
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The researchers analysed the blood samples in collaboration with researchers at the University of Adelaide and found differences between the levels of two fatty acids in people who lived on the respective islands.

"The level of the fatty acid associated with depression and found in many takeaway foods was higher in people living on the island with ready access to fast food, the level of the fatty acid associated with protection against depression and found in seafood was higher on the other island," said Dr Berger.

Professor Sarnyai said depression affects about one in seven people at some point in their lives and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are disproportionately affected by psychological distress and mental ill-health compared with the general population.
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