Feeling agitated in the absence of your smartphone? 23% millennials are addicted to the device

PSU was defined as any behaviour linked to smartphones that has the features of an addiction.

Agencies
Over the past decade there has been an increase in smartphone use among children and young people and this has occurred at the same time as a rise in common mental disorders in the same age group.
LONDON: Almost a quarter of young people are so dependent on their smartphones that they feel panicky or upset when the phone is unavailable, according to a global study.

By analysing literature published since 2011 when smartphones first became widespread, the range of studies showed that 10-30 per cent of children and young people used their smartphones in a dysfunctional way.

This means an average of 23 per cent of them were showing problematic smartphone usage (PSU), according to the researchers from King's College London in the UK.


PSU was defined as any behaviour linked to smartphones that has the features of an addiction, such as feeling panicky or upset when the phone is unavailable, they said.

The behaviour is also characterised by people finding it difficult to control the amount of time spent on the phone, and using the phone to the detriment of other enjoyable activities.

The study, published in the journal BMC Psychiatry, is the first to investigate the prevalence of PSU in children and young people at this scale, summarising findings from 41 studies that researched a total of 41,871 teenagers and young people.
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The 41 studies included 30 from Asia, nine from Europe and two America. As many as 55 per cent of the participants were female, and young women in the 17 to 19-year-old age group were most likely to have PSU.

Tech Neck, Text Claw & Smartphone Pinky: How Gadget Addiction Is Causing Deformities
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Technology has been a boon to us, but letting it hijack our lives can be quite challenging.



Excessive smartphone use, WiFi signal, and huge devices are causing more harm than good.



The advancement of technology and our addiction towards it, in turn, is leading to several changes in our bodies.

Technology has been a boon to us, but letting it hijack our lives can be quite challenging.Excessive smartphone use, WiFi signal, and huge devices are causing more harm than good.The advancement of t..
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Excessive smartphone and gadget use is ruining your spine. A new research has found out that constantly bending your neck to scroll on your smart devices can put a lot of pressure on the nape. One in four people between the age of 18 and 30 are seeing spiky growths (lumps) as long as 3 cm on the muscles where head meets the neck. This growth occurs to support the neck.

How to fix it: Don't let your smartphone addiction affect your posture. Simple, daily exercises can relieve you from headaches, and neck and back pain. Avoid looking down, and always keep the devices at eye level.
Excessive smartphone and gadget use is ruining your spine. A new research has found out that constantly bending your neck to scroll on your smart devices can put a lot of pressure on the nape. One i..
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With each passing day, the size of our smartphones is increasing. While one may not notice it easily, the phablets are causing a temporary deformity to the little finger. The bulky smartphones are leaving the pinky of your dominant hand noticeably more bent than the other. It could also be an underlying synonym to a condition called Dupuytren’s contracture, but it is always wise to get it checked.

How to fix it: Avoid holding your phones for long hours.
With each passing day, the size of our smartphones is increasing. While one may not notice it easily, the phablets are causing a temporary deformity to the little finger. The bulky smartphones are l..
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The 'cell phone elbow', also known as cubital tunnel syndrome, is a nerve compression syndrome that can cause tingling, numbness or pain in forearm and elbow. This could occur when you are talking over the be phone or using it non-stop.

A study by the University of Potsdam has also found out that a sedentary and lazy lifestyles is making our elbows shrink rapidly. Th prime reason for this is because we sit down too much and avoid every chance to walk.

How to fix it: Try using hands-free options or switch your hands frequently. Also, walk around.
The 'cell phone elbow', also known as cubital tunnel syndrome, is a nerve compression syndrome that can cause tingling, numbness or pain in forearm and elbow. This could occur when you are talking o..
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In a 2011 study, the researchers discovered that men who use laptop WiFi for over four hours might be risking their chance of being a father. It is said that the electromagnetic radiation affects the sperm count, mobility and affects DNA. Moreover, keeping gadgets in trouser pockets also hurts the reproductive system.

How to fix it: Get a table, and avoid keeping your devices on your lap when using them. Also, don't keep your smartphones in your trouser pockets.
In a 2011 study, the researchers discovered that men who use laptop WiFi for over four hours might be risking their chance of being a father. It is said that the electromagnetic radiation affects th..
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Constant texting and tapping on the smartphone can hurt your thumb. It can aggravate thumb problems like thumb arthritis, and trigger thumb which causes pain every time the thumb bends. If you have injured the thumb tendons, there is a possibility of developing tendonitis that results in painful swelling with overuse of a touch screen.

How to fix it: Avoid excessive thumb usage. Try texting with your fingers once in a while.
Constant texting and tapping on the smartphone can hurt your thumb. It can aggravate thumb problems like thumb arthritis, and trigger thumb which causes pain every time the thumb bends. If you have ..
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Do you experience cramps in your fingers even when not using a smartphone? This modern-day condition is called ‘text claw’ where the smartphone user experiences sudden pain and stiffness after using the smartphone. The pain can spread through the wrist and hand after engaging in fine motor activities like browsing, typing, sewing, beading, weaving, etc.

How to fix it: Easy exercises can help. Try stretching and massage your hands/wrists. Avoid excessive smartphone usage. Try hands-free options whenever possible.
Do you experience cramps in your fingers even when not using a smartphone? This modern-day condition is called ‘text claw’ where the smartphone user experiences sudden pain and stiffness after using..
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Constantly being hooked to your devices can lead to serious eye problems. More exposure to the blue light emitted from your smartphone can make your eyes tired, and lead to pain. Furthermore, it could hurt your vision, harm cornea, cause poor quality tear, and dry eyes.

How to fix it: It is better to limit blue light, and use soft tint. Use doctor-recommended eye drops.
Constantly being hooked to your devices can lead to serious eye problems. More exposure to the blue light emitted from your smartphone can make your eyes tired, and lead to pain. Furthermore, it coul..
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Prolonged earphone use or playing music on high volume can damage the hearing ability. If not given enough time to recover, it can lead to serious problems and can leave hearing damaged permanently.

How to fix it: Avoid excessive use of earphones, or listening to music on high volume. Try hand-free options when using gadgets.
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The researchers also investigated the links of this type of smartphone usage and mental health, and found a consistent association between PSU and poor measures of mental health in terms of depressed mood, anxiety, stress, poor sleep quality and educational attainment.

"In order to determine whether PSU should be classified as a behavioural addiction we need longitudinal data looking at PSU in relation to more objective health outcomes, as well as evidence that people with PSU struggle to moderate their use," said first author Samantha Sohn from the King's College London.
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"Our review assesses the effects not just of heavy use, but of dysfunctional smartphone use, and by looking at an 'addicted' pattern of behaviour towards smartphones we have established correlations between this type of dysfunctional behaviour and poorer mental health outcomes," said Ben Carter, also from King's College London.

Over the past decade there has been an increase in smartphone use among children and young people and this has occurred at the same time as a rise in common mental disorders in the same age group, the researchers noted.
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To help clarify the possible association between smartphone use and mental health in children and young people, the researchers investigated patterns of smartphone-related behaviour, rather than smartphone use per se.

"Smartphones are here to stay and there is a need to understand the prevalence of problematic smartphone usage. We don't know whether it is the smartphone itself that can be addictive or the apps that people use," said Nicola Kalk from the King's College London.
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